The Unlimited Garden
...where abilities grow!

The Unlimited Garden
brochure

"Gardens are Good Medicine"
Healthy Gardening Workshops

"Gardening for Good"
Flower & Vegetable Gardening Programs 2012


The unlimited Garden is an enabling 
garden staffed by horticultural therapists and supported by Master Gardener volunteers.  Five years in the making, it is the first of its kind in the Northeast and is completely accessible.

What is Horticultural Therapy?

Horticultural Therapy is the engagement of a person in garden-related activities, facilitated by a trained therapist, to improve health and well-being.

Benefits include...              

Sensory stimulation
Improvement of fine and gross motor skills
Enhanced socialization
Improvement of self-esteem
An opportunity for self-expression and creativity
A relaxing, fun recreational activity

 

   

Everyone is Welcome!

 
* Twenty-tow raised beds of various heights
* Smooth surface and open layout
* Open lattice fence permits views of meadows
   and woodlands
* Shade arbors and accessible tables & benches
* 240 sq. ft greenhouse and indoor classroom

 

   

The therapeutic benefits from gardening has long been established.  Now special needs individuals and groups can use the Unlimited Garden at the 4-H Training Center in Milton to learn more about the therapeutic joys of gardening.


A staff of dedicated horticultural therapists is dedicated to teaching people with disabilities all aspects of  gardening.

The Unlimited Garden is a community effort.  With over 100 individuals and businesses donating time, materials and funds, the Unlimited Garden has grown out of community generosity.  And our efforts have not stopped at the garden.  We are currently in the planning stages of adding a multi-use resource center next to the garden.  This center will include a classroom, manual arts room, and a greenhouse so the opportunities for the community will not be limited to the growing season.  

The Unlimited Garden, five years in the making, is the first of its kind in the Northeast and is completely handicapped accessible.  It's also designed to be tended to and harvested by the handicapped, disabled and the elderly. 

Click for larger image.For those in wheelchairs, there are wide aisles and specially designed raised beds.  In fact, the entire garden, from layout to planting containers, has been specially designed and constructed to facilitate gardening by those with special needs.  In addition, there are umbrellas for those people who are on medication and are sensitive to sunlight.  Specially designed hand tools for those who suffer from arthritis or other limiting impairments are also available.  When visitors are ready for a break, picnic tables are situated in the shade for the gardeners, some without seats to accommodate wheelchairs, and some with benches.

Click for larger image.For those people who depend on walkers, there are garden beds at varying levels, benches and gathering bags specially designed to hook onto a walker.  And all of the raised beds are carefully constructed so that all areas of the bed can be reached from wheelchair height either by hand, or by using some specially modified tools.  Every part of the garden was designed to facilitate use by those who are physically challenged. 

Even the visually impaired can use the garden.  In one section, there are four triangular beds, each with Braille identification tags.  One bed has brightly colored flowers and plants, another has lamb's ear and similar plants that are soothing to the touch.  The third bed has various herbs for the sense of taste, and the fourth has plants that smell good.

Click for larger image.A shed which is handicapped accessible houses all the tools and equipment that is to be used in the garden.  Additionally, all the material grown and harvested in the garden is used by the participants themselves.

How can you become involved?  If your group of special needs individuals would like to use the garden, please call the Unlimited Garden at (518)885-8977 and ask for Carol Whitelaw.

 

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